Body Composition in Very Preterm Infants: Role of Neonatal Characteristics and Nutrition in Achieving Growth Similar to Term Infants.


  • Date de publication : 2016-11-20

Référence

Tremblay G, Boudreau C, Bélanger S, St-Onge O, Pronovost E, Simonyan D, Marc I. Body Composition in Very Preterm Infants: Role of Neonatal Characteristics and Nutrition in Achieving Growth Similar to Term Infants. Neonatology. 2016;111:214-221. doi: 10.1159/000450882. PubMed PMID: 27866210.

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Résumé

The identification of factors involved in the postnatal growth of preterm infants will help achieve growth similar to that of term infants.As per protocol: to compare body composition in very preterm infants at term-corrected age (TCA) with that in term infants, and to explore relationships between neonatal characteristics and body composition in preterm infants.Anthropometry, nutritional characteristics, and neonatal outcomes were prospectively collected in 26 preterm (<29 weeks) and 33 term (37-40 weeks) infants. Body composition using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was measured at TCA in preterm infants and between days 7 and 10 in term infants.Parenteral nutrition in preterm infants provided a mean of 2.9 ± 0.2 and 2.1 ± 0.5 g/kg/day of intravenous amino acids and lipids, respectively, during the first week of life. The mean weight gain velocity from birth to DXA assessment was 12.1 ± 1.4 g/kg/day. Compared with term infants, preterm infants at TCA were shorter and lighter, with a smaller head circumference, a lower weight estimated by DXA (2,960 ± 552 vs. 3,843 ± 377 g), and increased skinfold thicknesses. Fat mass percent (13.9 ± 5.4%) and lean mass percent (84.7 ± 5.6%) in preterm infants were similar to those in term infants (14.7 ± 3.5 and 83.5 ± 3.6%, respectively). Neonatal weight gain velocity in preterm infants was positively associated with lean mass (grams).Subcutaneous fat is increased in preterm infants. Higher protein intake in preterm infants might increase weight gain velocity and achieve a lean mass comparable to that of term infants.


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